North West Education MEC Viola Motsumi Gives Pupils A Stern Warning Over Crimes Committed At Schools.

Opening Remarks by the Minister of Basic Education, Mrs Angie Motshekga, MP, at the Council of Education Ministers (CEM) meeting held at the Sol Plaatje Building, Pretoria Deputy Minister MEC’s Director-General HoDs Senior Management It is my pleasure to welcome all MECs, HoDs and senior education managers to the ordinary sitting of CEM in 2022. I send my gratitude to all attendees, as these meetings allow us to make crucial decisions while also learning from each other. We mustn’t take our responsibilities as executive authorities for granted. On our broad shoulders, we hold dreams and aspirations of generations. As basic education mandarins, we must lead from the front in the national endeavour to improve the quality of basic education through deeds, not words. It is vital that the basic education sector fires on all cylinders and put our country back on the growth path, end poverty and reduce inequalities that continue to bedevil our homeland. I am beginning to see green shoots. I am particularly enamoured by the progress made in the Eastern Cape Mother Tongue Education – Eastern Cape model and the Afrikaans teaching: The Eastern Cape Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education (MTBBE) Pilot is a runaway success. The EC DOE initiated the Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education (MTBBE) pilot, wherein 712 schools are using IsiXhosa and Sesotho as the language of learning and teaching (LoLT) beyond the Foundation Phase. Learners in these schools are taught Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology in their home languages, IsiXhosa and Sesotho. This initiative was started in 72 Cofimvaba schools in Grade 4 in 2012 and incrementally in subsequent grades. And it was implemented up to Grade 7 in 2018. The province scaled-up implementation to 1 025 schools in 2019. The province is working with other stakeholders such as Rhodes University, University of Fort Hare, Oxford University Press, Pearson, and PanSALB to implement MTBBE. Over the years, there have been several attempts to promote African languages as languages of learning and teaching beyond the Foundation Phase with no success at all. Only English and Afrikaans are used as LoLT throughout the schooling system except in the Eastern Cape. Through the Eastern Cape’s Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education initiative IsiXhosa and Sesotho are used as LoLT beyond the Foundation Phase. We congratulate abantu basezilalini and urge other provinces to emulate the Home of the Legends. On the whole, we are collaborating with NECT, Old Mutual and the Department of Sports, Arts Culture and Recreation to put a plan in place to promote African Language “Mother Tongue” Based Bilingual Education. On Infrastructure Under the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI) and Sanitation Appropriate for Education (SAFE), we have a budget of R2.4 billion for 2021/22. The implementing agents reported that work to the value of R2.3 billion has already been certified. All indications are that we will utilise the budget in full. On ASIDI, we have achieved the following: In 2011, there were 328 schools made of inappropriate material that needed to be replaced. Of these, 290 have already progressed to practical completion. The remaining 38 are scheduled for completion before the end of March 2022. Water supply projects at 1 177 schools have already progressed to practical completion. The remaining 94 are scheduled for completion before the end of March 2022. Similarly, there were 1 271 schools in need of water supply. There were 1 028 schools in need of sanitation. Sanitation projects at 995 schools have already progressed to practical completion. The remaining 33 are scheduled for completion before the end of March 2022. Some 373 required electrical connections. All of these schools have been served under the programme. We have developed a complete set of appropriate toilets for the SAFE programme for 1 635 of the required 2 819 schools dependent on basic pit toilets. The remaining 1 184 is scheduled for completion before the end of 2022/23. Sadly, some provinces have only utilised 60% of their infrastructure budget by the end of February. We have identified the following challenges: We need reliable data on the current state of school infrastructure We need to eradicate infrastructure backlogs relating to inappropriate structures, sanitation and water supply We need to eradicate pit latrine toilets. We need to repair schools damaged by storms immediately. Yet, the current implementation mechanism is not delivering the results we require. We need to consider an alternative approach to the delivery of school infrastructure. The current procurement process is prolonged and cumbersome. Gauteng Education has proved that you can obtain value for money by using community builders and local suppliers. We need to find legal ways to procure such builders and suppliers. The implementation agents seem to be overloaded with projects from various client departments hence the snail pace of delivery. Full-time Return to Learning I am pleased to announce that in 17,374 ordinary public schools (98.5%) and 4,387 special public schools (99.8%), learners return to daily attendance as of 07 February 2022. Impressively in the Free State and Limpopo, all ordinary public schools returned to daily attendance as required. Even more gratifying is that all special schools returned to daily attendance as required in six provinces (Free State, Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and Western Cape). There were no significant differences in Quantile 1, 2, 3 and 5 schools regarding the number of schools that could not return to daily attendance. Furthermore, it is encouraging that only 12 rural/farm secondary schools cannot return to daily attendance. Over 90% of our teachers are back at school since the return of all learners to full-time attendance. This figure pertains to the first day of daily attendance. Challenges of Daily Return to School There is a problem of overcrowding in some schools. In this regard, I have initiated a Special Intervention Programme (SIPOS) to alleviate the shortage of classrooms and furniture, leading to overcrowding in schools. The Special Intervention programme aims to ensure the complete return to daily attendance and to implement the sector’s recovery plan after two years of learning losses in schools. The matter was exacerbated by the total return of learners to schools after two years of Covid-19, vandalism and storm damage to some schools. Shortage of classrooms and desks undermine our post-Covid-19 recovery programme. I am glad that society continues to be behind us on the return to full- time attendance of all learners to school. However, some schools still rely on alternative or rotational timetables to educate thousands of learners, not because of Covid-19 but the shortage of learning space and furniture. The building of additional classrooms is slow, affected by red tape and bureaucratic processes. The supply of mobile classrooms was a quick solution, but it has its challenges. For instance, we have received various reports of exorbitant prices paid for mobile classrooms. The intervention programme that I have initiated involves the supply of additional classrooms to affected schools at a reduced cost and faster turnaround. We bypass the conventional methods of procurement by appointing service providers. The plan includes moving away from the traditional use of mobile classrooms to solve the classrooms shortage and respond to overcrowding challenges. In this programme, funds are deposited to the school to build additional classrooms. It has been a successful programme in Gauteng. And our DM had used the same method in Mpumalanga when she was still MEC. I have set up a team-leading this project and exploring all the options to implement the programme legally and efficiently. The team, which includes appointed provincial officials, will identify schools, set up conditions for schools, provide building specifications and clarify roles and responsibilities at all sector levels. Strategies to address overcrowding issues: Best Practice Strategies to address overcrowding include the following: Transferring of funds to schools for self-management of classrooms [Gauteng Province] The rehabilitation and refurbishment programme [Gauteng Province] Restoring dysfunctional and inhabitable learning spaces [Gauteng Province] Space audit is done to ensure best possible use of space [North West] Construction of new classrooms and schools [Northern Cape] Some schools are platooning while waiting for the provision of mobile classrooms [Free State] Finally, I must reiterate for posterity that there’s no 30 % pass to achieve a matric pass. Here is how you pass matric: Admission to a Bachelors Field for Study: Must obtain at least 40% for your Home Language (Compulsory), Must get at least 50% for FOUR other subjects excluding Life Orientation, Must receive at least 30% for Language of Learning and Teaching (LOLT), Must receive at least 30% for ONE other subject, Must pass at least 6 out of 7 subjects. Admission to a Diploma Field of Study: Must obtain at least 40% for your Home Language (Compulsory), Must receive at least 40% for THREE other subjects excluding Life Orientation, Must get at least 30% for the Language of Learning and Teaching (LOLT) of the tertiary institution (Higher Education Institution), Must pass at least 6 out of 7 subjects Admission to a Higher Certificate Field of Study: Must obtain at least 40% for your Home Language(Compulsory), Must receive at least 40% for TWO other subjects, Must get at least 30% for Three other subjects; Must obtain at least 30% for the Language of Learning and Teaching (LOLT) of the tertiary institution (Higher Education Institution), Must pass at least 6 out of 7 subjects. National Senior Certificate: Must obtain at least 40% for your Home Language (Compulsory), Must receive at least 40% for TWO other subjects, Must get at least 30% for THREE other subjects; Must pass at least 6 out of 7 subjects. I thank you. Issued by: Department of Basic Education More from: Department of Basic Education More on: Education Facebook(link is external) Twitter(link is external) LinkedIn(link is external) E-mail(link sends e-mail) Print EXPLORE GOV.ZA

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Capricorn South District

21st November 2023

Collective efforts produce top results – Biddy Ratale

Pietersburg circuit manager Biddy Ratale is on a mission to maintain quality results for all schools in the circuit. POLOKWANE – Biddy Ratale, the manager of the Pietersburg Circuit in the Department of Education is on a mission to maintain quality results for all the schools in the circuit. Ratale manages 56 registered schools including independent schools, public special schools, primary schools and secondary schools in the circuit. Last year, two schools from the circuit, namely Myngenoegen English Private School and Northern Muslim School produced a 100% matric pass rate. She says since joining the circuit in 2015, consistent good results have been a priority. “Our motto in the Pietersburg Circuit is, ‘The Hub of Educational Excellence’ and we want to keep it that way. For the past three years, we have been recognised as the number one circuit in terms of producing quality bachelor passes. “In 2020, we produced 1 260 quality bachelor passes and obtained 88.8% with position one in the province. In 2021 again as a circuit we produced 1 285 quality bachelor passes with an overall performance of 86.0%, also in the first position. Last year saw an increase in bachelor passes to 1 389, still in the first position.” She says they pride themselves on the quality of work they produce. “Our performance is due to hard work, dedication, staying focused and doing everything to the best of our ability. We also work as a team and incorporate the Circuit Quality Learning and Teaching Committee team, to support all our circuit programmes including motivation, and crime prevention. This team comprises men and women from various sectors including churches, the police, Health and Social Development Departments, Correctional Services, teacher unions and School Governing Bodies. This collective, together with our hardworking principals, are the reason behind the success of the circuit.” She added that they have focused, hardworking and dedicated teachers and principals, who put the learners first in everything they do. “My wish for all the schools in the circuit, is that we should not have any school performing below 90% and to have no underperformers in terms of matric results. In 2022, we had two schools that underperformed in the matric results. We are collectively hard to get them out of this unfortunate category.” Despite a shortage of schools in the city, the circuit maintains good results, she said. “The Pietersburg Circuit serves a diverse community for which we don’t have enough schools. We see this during the annual admission period. We wish for schools to be built in order to address the influx of people in the city. “Our schools also need parental support, as our teachers are under tremendous pressure with learners who get involved in social ills, such as drugs abuse. We do have developmental programmes to empower our representative councils of learners, school management teams, governing bodies and teachers in the circuit. The main challenge we are facing in achieving our goals is funding.” She says they appeal to the business sector to invest in the best performing circuit in the province, as an investment in education is an investment in the future.

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Capricorn South District

12th October 2023

National Teaching Awards

The Department of Basic Education wishes to salute all schools and teachers who have entered the National Teaching Awards (NTA). The NTA Scheme was conceptualised and launched in 2000 and now enters its twenty third (23rd) year of implementation. Through extensive consultation, the scheme has been refined, sharpened, as well as broadened in terms of its frame and categories. We therefore welcome you to the 23rd edition of the NTA. The NTA scheme is one of the ways in which the Department of Basic Education (DBE) acknowledges the extraordinary efforts made by excellent teachers, often in very difficult conditions. Such teachers provide for better futures for learners, because the lack of quality education is a major factor behind many social, political, economic and health challenges faced by the world today; as well as contributing to poverty, prejudice and conflict. The concept of appreciating and recognising teachers has gained world-wide prominence and as a result South African teachers are encouraged to participate and shine on the global stage. Some of the awards that are open to the teachers are: The African Union (AU) Teachers’ Award. The Global Teacher Prize; and The Commonwealth Education Award. To mark the twenty-first (21st) Anniversary of the National Teaching Awards, the DBE added three new categories which have been integrated into the 22nd NTA. The additional categories introduced include the National Best Teacher Award, the SHERO Award and the National Learner Award. More details:- https://www.education.gov.za/Informationfor/Teachers/NationalTeachingAwards.aspx

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Capricorn South District

02nd October 2023

Limpopo Education

The roll-out of decent sanitation and school infrastructure in Limpopo is one of the key milestones for the 6th adminstration. Access to quality basic education must happen in a decent and habitable environment.

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Capricorn South District

08th September 2023

Happy Youth Day Celebration (SA)

In commemoration of June 16, 1976 Soweto Uprising. Hector Pieterson being carried by Mbuyisa Makhubo after being shot by the South African police. His sister, Antoinette Sithole, runs beside them. Pieterson was rushed to a local clinic where he was declared dead on arrival. This photo by Sam Nzima became an icon of the Soweto uprising.

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Capricorn South District

16th June 2023

Grade 12 learners at a Limpopo school start a catch-up programme

Educators and grade twelve learners at Klaas Mothapo Secondary School in Mankweng in Limpopo have started a catch-up program by turning their school into a camp. Teachers and learners believe this camp will help learners who have lost time due to the lockdown, perform better in the 2020 final examinations. The Limpopo Education Department says it will accommodate more than one hundred and forty part-time and full-time learners next week.

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Capricorn South District

31st January 2023

2022 NSC Results Announcement

2022 National Senior Certificate(NSC) Result Announcement

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Capricorn South District

20th January 2023

The Matric Class of 2022

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Capricorn South District

19th January 2023

DBE FINALISES CURRICULUM CHANGES TO INTRODUCE ROBOTICS, CODING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Motshekga addressed members of the South African Democratic Teachers’ Union at their national general council meeting in Kempton Park. FILE: Education Minister Angie Motshekga. Picture: GCIS. FILE: Education Minister Angie Motshekga. Picture: GCIS. Angie Motshekga Department of Basic Education SADTU Email Print Nkosikhona Duma | 04 October 2022 17:51 JOHANNESBURG - Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga said on Tuesday they have finalised curriculum changes to introduce robotics and coding at public schools. Motshekga addressed members of the South African Democratic Teachers’ Union at their national general council meeting in Kempton Park. She said incorporating robotics and coding at schools, formed part of efforts to prepare pupils to meaningfully participate in the economy. Motshekga said reforming the country’s schools’ curriculum was an important part of ensuring that South Africa kept up with the changing demands of the local and global labour market. She said her department was busy preparing educators ahead of introducing robotics and coding at schools. Motshekga added that they were also working on a plan to introduce new subjects in grades 10 to 12 in a bid to strengthen the country’s curriculum. “These will infuse cross-cutting themes such as entrepreneurship, digital literacy, climate change and citizenship into our curriculum.” She said they were also conducting a national assessment to determine how to better prepare pupils at the early childhood development level for the changes in curriculum.

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Capricorn South District

09th November 2022